Beyond Pesticides Want Congress To Do A thing About Cannabis & Pesticide Use

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Here’s their weblog post of  eight October.

(Beyond Pesticides, October eight, 2019) As medicinal and recreational marijuana continue to be legalized in a developing quantity of states, issues about the security of the burgeoning industry—how the substance is grown, harvested, processed, distributed, sold, and used—have emerged. Pesticides have not been registered for use in cannabis production, but they are becoming extensively made use of beneath state-adopted enforcement levels that imply security, but not topic to any typical of critique that meets pesticide registration requirements.

Pesticide contamination of health-related cannabis is significant not only for the reason that it introduces toxic chemical compounds into a medicine, but also for the reason that health-related cannabis can interfere with the body’s capability to detoxify these pesticides. Cannabinoids have been shown to inhibit the activity of enzymes that aid detoxify chemical compounds, which can make pesticides much more toxic.

Inform your U.S. Representative and Senators to hold oversight hearings and request investigations into EPA and state responsibilities to avoid misuse of pesticides on cannabis.

New Frontier Information CEO Giadha Aguirre de Carcer, pointing to California residue testing final results, cites a threat to the medicinal cannabis industry. She notes that 84% of 2016 item batches tested had been located to harbor pesticide residue and that in the current California round of assays 20% failed established state requirements due to contamination from pesticides, bacteria, or processing chemical compounds, and in some situations, inaccurate labeling.

Colorado, Washington, and Oregon have all taken methods to list “allowable” pesticides for marijuana cultivation. On the other hand, by law, states can’t label pesticides that do not have a federal pesticide registration—which can’t be achieved for the reason that of marijuana’s illegal federal status. California started in June 2018 to set out parameters for testing of cannabis at this juncture, all cannabis for health-related and recreational use will have to be tested for 66 distinct proscribed pesticides, as nicely as for other contaminants, such as E. coli, feces, mold, insect and rodent components, mycotoxins, terpenoids, and heavy metals. The regulatory matrix in the states is dynamic, and events such as Colorado’s recalls and California’s fraudulent lab reporting could spur additional adjustments.

Pesticide use on marijuana is illegal. Since marijuana is not a legal agricultural crop beneath relevant federal law (Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act) and hemp has only not too long ago been legalized, EPA has not evaluated the security of any pesticide on marijuana plants. EPA has established no allowances for pesticide use in cannabis production, and no tolerances, nor any exemptions from tolerances, for pesticide residues on cannabis. In the absence of federal regulations governing pesticides in cannabis production, the use of pesticides not registered by EPA is illegal. Quite a few states have codified this understanding by adopting policies that prohibit all federally registered pesticides. Other states have taken the position that state policy is unnecessary, considering the fact that EPA has not registered any pesticides for cannabis production and registered pesticide use is illegal. A critique of state laws performed by Beyond Pesticides finds a patchwork of regulations with varying degrees of protection for buyers and the atmosphere.

Since of the absence of thorough federal testing of possible effects of the use of pesticides on cannabis for buyers, producers, and the atmosphere, states do not have the authority to permit pesticide use in cannabis production and processing. State could, nevertheless, offer clear guidelines for sustainable production practices that will defend public overall health and the atmosphere.

The lack of federal critique and registration of pesticides made use of in cannabis production proficiently demands the business to embrace only these inputs exempt from federal registration and adopt accurate organic soil management practices.

Beyond Pesticides has advised that states establish laws and/or regulations that mandate an organic systems strategy to cannabis production. A requirement, for instance, that growers and processors comply with the dictates of national organic soil management requirements would be prudent, precautionary, and a good trajectory for the cannabis business.

Congress need to intervene to defend public overall health and security. Ask them to:

  • Hold oversight hearings to document state violations of federal pesticide law by permitting the pesticide use in cannabis production and processing, in spite of not becoming registered for this use by EPA.
  • Request an OIG and Government Accountability investigation to help in clarifying EPA and state enforcement duty to guarantee compliance with pesticide item labels.

Letter to Congress

Please intervene to defend public overall health and security from misuse of pesticides on cannabis. As medicinal and recreational marijuana continue to be legalized in a developing quantity of states, issues about the security of the burgeoning industry—how the substance is grown, harvested, processed, distributed, sold, and used—have emerged. Pesticides have not been registered for use in cannabis production, but they are becoming extensively made use of beneath state-adopted enforcement levels that imply security, but not topic to any typical of critique that meets pesticide registration requirements.

Pesticide contamination of health-related cannabis is significant not only for the reason that it introduces toxic chemical compounds into a medicine, but also for the reason that health-related cannabis can interfere with the body’s capability to detoxify these pesticides. Cannabinoids have been shown to inhibit the activity of enzymes that aid detoxify chemical compounds, which can make pesticides much more toxic.

Pesticide use on marijuana is illegal. Since marijuana is not a legal agricultural crop beneath relevant federal law (Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act) and hemp has only not too long ago been legalized, EPA has not evaluated the security of any pesticide on marijuana plants. EPA has established no allowances for pesticide use in cannabis production, and no tolerances, nor any exemptions from tolerances, for pesticide residues on cannabis. In the absence of federal regulations governing pesticides in cannabis production, the use of pesticides not registered by EPA is illegal. Quite a few states have codified this understanding by adopting policies that prohibit all federally registered pesticides. Other states have taken the position that state policy is unnecessary, considering the fact that EPA has not registered any pesticides for cannabis production and registered pesticide use is illegal. A critique of state laws performed by Beyond Pesticides finds a patchwork of regulations with varying degrees of protection for buyers and the atmosphere.

Since of the absence of thorough federal testing of possible effects of the use of pesticides on cannabis for buyers, producers, and the atmosphere, states do not have the authority to permit pesticide use in cannabis production and processing. State could, nevertheless, offer clear guidelines for sustainable production practices that will defend public overall health and the atmosphere.

The lack of federal critique and registration of pesticides made use of in cannabis production proficiently demands the business to embrace only these inputs exempt from federal registration and adopt accurate organic soil management practices.

States need to establish laws and/or regulations that mandate an organic systems strategy to cannabis production. A requirement, for instance, that growers and processors comply with the dictates of national organic soil management requirements would be prudent, precautionary, and a good trajectory for the cannabis business.

Please defend public overall health and security by:

  • Holding oversight hearings to document state violations of federal pesticide law by permitting the pesticide use in cannabis production and processing, in spite of not becoming registered for this use by EPA.
  • Requesting an OIG and Government Accountability investigation to help in clarifying EPA and state enforcement duty to guarantee compliance with pesticide item labels.

Thank you for your consideration to this significant challenge.

Much more at  https://beyondpesticides.org/dailynewsblog/2019/10/take-action-congressional-oversight-required-on-illegal-pesticide-use-in-cannabis-production-and-resulting-contamination/

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